Academics

MPES_Spring 2017 Courses FlyerJust Added Spring 2017

Fall 2016 Engaged Scholarship Courses

AFRAMER 20: Introduction to African Languages and Cultures

Introduction to African Languages and Cultures
John Mugane, Professor of the Practice of African Languages and Cultures and Director of the African Language Program

This introduction to African languages and cultures explores how sub-Saharan Africans use language to understand, organize, and transmit (culture, history, etc.) indigenous knowledge to successive generations. Language serves as a road map to comprehending how social, political, and economic institutions and processes develop: from kinship structures and the evolution of political offices to trade relations and the transfer of environmental knowledge. As a Social Engagement course, AAAS 20 will wed scholarly inquiry and academic study to practical experience and personal involvement in the community. Students will be given the opportunity to study Africans, their languages, and their cultures from the ground up, not only through textbooks and data sets but through personal relationships, cultural participation, and inquisitive explorations of local African heritage communities. Throughout the semester you will be asked to employ video production, ethnographic research, creative writing, "social-portraiture," GIS mapping, and linguistic study as you engage with Africans, their languages, and their cultures. By examining linguistic debates and cultural traditions and interrogating their import in the daily lives of Boston-area Africans, we hope to bridge the divide between grand theories and everyday practices, between intellectual debates and the lived experiences of individuals, between the American academy and the African world. Ultimately, this course aims to place Africans themselves in the center of the academic study of Africa.

Course Notes: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Societies of the World.

GOV 1359: The Road to the White House (ES Section)

GOV 1359: The Road to the White House (ES Section)                                                                                            Carlos Diaz Rosillo, Lecturer on Government 

This course examines the role of presidential campaigns and elections in American politics.  It studies the origins and evolution of the presidential selection process and explores how modern campaigns inform, influence, and mobilize voters.  Topics to be studied include the role of political parties and candidates, campaign strategies and tactics, political advertising and media coverage, campaign finance and voter mobilization, and the transition from campaigning to governing.  The 2016 campaign will be used as a laboratory in which to explore political science research on presidential campaigns and elections.

This course includes one (1) Engaged Scholarship discussion section. This will entail volunteering for one of the two presidential election campaigns, either the Democratic or Republican nominee, over a roughly 6 week period between mid Sept through Election Day in November.

 

PORTUG 59: Portuguese and the Community

Portuguese and the Community
Everton Vargas da Costa, Lecturer in Romance Languages and Literatures (Portuguese)

This is an advanced language course examining the Luso-African-Brazilian experience in the United States. This course promotes community engagement as a vehicle for greater linguistic fluency and cultural understanding. Students are placed with community organizations within the Boston area and volunteer for four hours a week. Class work will focus on expanding students' oral and written proficiency through discussing and analyzing readings, arts, and films by and about Luso-African-Brazilians in the US.

SOC-STD 68EC: Education and Community in America

Education and Community in America: Universities and Community Engagement, 1890-2016  
Ariane Mary Liazos, Preceptor in Expository Writing

Explores efforts to realize the civic purpose of American universities, particularly in terms of attempts to engage local communities through educational outreach programs. Examines major periods of experimentation and innovation in the 20th and 21st centuries, from the settlement house movement of the early 1900s to recent efforts to revive the public mission of universities through service-learning and other forms of civic education. This course is an activity-based learning course, limited to students who are concurrently participating in education-related service programs affiliated with Harvard. Class discussions and assignments will make active links with students' service work. Enrollment capped at 12.

SPANSH 59: Spanish and the Community

Spanish and the Community
Maria Luisa Parra, Senior Preceptor in Romance Languages and Literatures

An advanced language course that examines the richness and complexity of the Latino experience in the US while promoting community engagement as a vehicle for greater linguistic fluency and cultural understanding. Students are placed with community organizations within the Boston area and volunteer for four hours a week. Class work focuses on expanding students' oral and written proficiency in Spanish through discussing and analyzing readings, arts, and films by and about Latinos in the US.

US-WORLD 24: Reinventing (and Reimagining) Boston

Reinventing (and Reimagining) Boston: The Changing American City
Robert Sampson, Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences And David Luberoff, Lecturer on Sociology

In the last half of the 20th century, there was gloom about urban life and many cities were projected to decay. Although some did, others became models of urban renaissance. Using Boston as a case study of urban change, this course examines key issues such as economic inequality, political governance, crime and criminal justice institutions (e.g, policing, incarceration), racial segregation, immigration, and gentrification. We draw on a wide range of reading and data sources, as well as presentations by notable local practitioners, student visits to different parts of Boston, and a variety of writing assignments designed to help students better appreciate, understand, and participate in contemporary urban life. Course Notes: This course, when taken for a letter grade, may be counted for introductory Sociology concentration requirement.

Spring 2017 Engaged Scholarship Courses

EXPOS 231 and 232: Segregation and Boston Schools

EXPOS 231 and 232: Segregation and Boston Schools: The Fight for Equality                                                           Ariane Mary Liazos, Preceptor in Expository Writing

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1-2pm (231) and 2-3pm (232)

Over sixty years after the Supreme Court ruled that “separate but equal” schools are unconstitutional, segregation is on the rise. Today, despite widespread evidence that integrated education increases student learning and reduces prejudice, American public schools are increasingly divided by class and race. In this course, we investigate attempts to achieve educational equality in Boston, focusing on the decision to use busing to desegregate the public schools in the 1970s and the wave of violent opposition that followed. Throughout the semester, we undertake “engaged scholarship,” combining academic learning and community engagement by collaborating with Bostonians directly affected by these historical events – we partner with history teachers and students at a neighborhood high school in the Boston Public Schools (BPS) system – and by focusing on communication with diverse audiences through writing, speaking, and visual presentation. 

To ground our understanding of the complex issues we will wrestle with, we begin with a journalist’s Pulitzer Prize winning account of school integration in the 1970s, contrasting the perspectives of black and white families. We next examine historical debates on the causes of the “antibusing” movement and pedagogical debates about how to teach controversial and contested historical topics. For the final project, we have the opportunity to further investigate these topics and other current challenges around educational equity facing BPS. In thoughtful collaboration with our community partners and through research, we design lesson plans for a high school course on desegregation and prepare arguments for why the various plans might be effective. We not only delve into the remarkable written and visual materials in Harvard’s libraries but also conduct conversations with teachers and students at Brighton High School. The class culminates in a “Civics Fair” (held at Harvard’s Education Portal serving residents of the Allston and Brighton neighborhoods) in which students present their lesson plans and engage with our partners at Brighton High and other community members.

PLEASE NOTE: The “Engaged Scholarship” components of this course include three required meetings outside class time that have been tentatively scheduled in March and April: a panel discussion held on Harvard’s campus with teachers from Brighton High (March 7 from 7:00-8:30 PM); a visit to Brighton High (students have the option of visiting on either April 5 from 7:45-10:45 AM or April 7 from 11:15 AM-2:15 PM); and a “Civics Fair” Hosted by the Harvard Ed Portal (April 28 from 10:30 AM-1:30 PM).

MLD 377: Organizing: People, Power, Change

MLD 377: Organizing: People, Power, Change
Marshall Ganz, Senior Lecturer in Public Policy, John F. Kennedy School of Government

Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:15-2:30 pm

"In democratic countries, knowledge of how to combine is the mother of all other forms of knowledge; on its progress depends that of all the others," de Tocqueville observed. Fulfilling the democratic promise of equity, accountability and inclusion requires the participation of an "organized" citizenry that can articulate and assert its shared interests effectively. We can use the practice of organizing to engage others in confronting major public challenges by enabling muted voices to be heard, values to be translated into action, and political will to mobilize. Leadership in organizing requires accepting responsibility to enable others to achieve shared purpose in the face of uncertainty. Organizers ask three questions: who are my people, what is their challenge, and how can they turn resources they have into the power they need to meet that challenge. In this course, students accept responsibility for organizing a "constituency" to achieve an outcome by the end of the semester. Students learn as reflective practitioners of leadership of their campaign: building relationships committed to common purpose; turning value into motivated action through narrative; strategizing to turn resources into the power to achieve outcomes; taking effective action; and structuring leadership collaboratively.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Registration for this course has two required steps:

1. Complete this Student Commitment Form as soon as possible: http://bit.ly/2iXHpWn

2. Follow the regular steps for class registration on my.harvard. For any questions please email organizingcourse@gmail.com

MUSIC 176R: Music and Disability

MUSIC 176R: Music and Disability
Andrew Clark, Senior Lecturer on Music, Director of Choral Activities

Wednesdays 12-2 pm

Through field work, readings, discussions, and presentations, this course will explore topics related to disability in music history, music theory, and performance studies, and examine recent developments in neuroscience, music therapy, and music education. Defining disability as a cultural construction rather than as a medical pathology, the course will also consider the practice of music as a vehicle of empowerment, reflecting on music’s generative role in shaping communities and advancing social justice and human rights. Students will design and implement inclusive and democratic community music projects, partnering with local service organizations and educational institutions.

SOC-STD 68CT: The Chinese Immigrant Experience in America

The Chinese Immigrant Experience in America
Nicole Newendorp, Lecturer in Social Studies

Thursdays 1-3 pm

Uses the history of Boston’s Chinatown as a case study to examine the experiences of Chinese immigrants in the U.S. from the 1880s until the present. Employs historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives to examine major themes related to the social and economic development of U.S. Chinatowns and Chinese immigrant communities throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. This course is an activity-based learning course, limited to students who are concurrently participating in a Harvard-affiliated service program in or around Boston’s Chinatown. Class discussions and assignments will make active links with students’ service work. Open to students in all concentrations.

Visit the course website to learn more about the course project.

SPANSH 59: Spanish and the Community

Spanish and the Community
Maria Luisa Parra, Senior Preceptor in Romance Languages and Literatures

An advanced language course that examines the richness and complexity of the Latino experience in the US while promoting community engagement as a vehicle for greater linguistic fluency and cultural understanding. Students are placed with community organizations within the Boston area and volunteer for four hours a week. Class work focuses on expanding students' oral and written proficiency in Spanish through discussing and analyzing readings, arts, and films by and about Latinos in the US.

SPANSH 59H: Spanish for Latino Students II

Spanish for Latino Students II: Connecting with the Community                                                                                      Maria Luisa Parra, Senior Preceptor in Romance Languages and Literatures

Tuesdays & Thursdays 1-2:30 pm

An advanced language course for Spanish heritage learners that aims to: strengthen students’ oral and written linguistic range, with emphasis on Spanish use for academic contexts; and to further develop students’ critical language and social awareness around important issues for Latinos in our globalized era: Spanish as global language, identity, language rights, global migration and labor, U.S.-Latino America relations, food and environment, the ’war on drugs’. Students explore these topics through various genres (newspapers and academic articles, debates, literary essays, short novels, poetry, visual art, film and music) and through 4 hours a week of community service.

PSY 1009: Psychology of Women

PSY 1009: Psychology of Women                                                                                                                               Nicole Noll, Preceptor in Psychology

Tuesdays & Thursdays 10-11:30 am

How does being a woman affect our behavior, our evaluations of ourselves, and our interactions with others? This course examines psychological science on women and girls in western industrialized societies, addressing such topics as gender stereotypes, girlhood, women and work, relationships, pregnancy and motherhood, mental health, violence against women, and women in later adulthood. We will consider these topics through an understanding of gender as a social construction, being mindful of the intersections of gender, sexuality, class, and race. Although focused on women’s lives and experiences, this course is highly relevant to people of all genders.

Course Notes: The Psychology Department requires completion of Science of Living Systems 20 (or equivalent) and at least one foundational course from PSY 14, PSY 15, PSY 18, or Science of Living Systems 15 before enrolling in this course. 

 

 

Other Academic

Emerging Scholars Program

Emerging Scholars Program                                                                                                                                          Robin Gottlieb, Professor of the Practice of Mathematics, Senior Teaching Associate at Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning                                                                                                                                                             Brendan Kelly, Preceptor of Mathematics

This new, four-year pilot program is designed for Freshman interested in STEM fields who need additional support in Mathematics. Students are selected through an application process.