Academics

Fall 2017 Engaged Scholarship Courses

SOC-ST 68 UH: Urban Health and Community Change: Action Planning With Local Stakeholders

SOC-ST 68 UH: Urban Health and Community Change: Action Planning With Local Stakeholders                  Flavia Peréa, Director of the Mindich Program for Engaged Scholarship; Lecturer on Social Studies

This is a project-based course on urban community health. We will examine urban health topics from a macro level in the classroom, while exploring community health issues at the local level by engaging with community stakeholders on a health promotion project. We will explore the social conditions people need to be healthy, and strategies to advance health equity that put people in diverse communities on pathways to health as opposed to disparities. To understand how health promoting environments can be created and sustained, we will discuss how community engagement, participatory planning, and cross-sector collaboration can advance health improvement efforts at the local level. There are great possibilities as well as challenges to creating and sustaining healthy communities, particularly in rapidly evolving cities in major metropolitan areas. This course will provide a window into how pressing, highly visible and complex national issues are experienced and addressed in real time, and the real-world complexities involved in advancing meaningful community change. Open to students in all concentrations. Enrollment capped at 10.

 

SLAVIC 189: The Other Russia: Twenty-First Century Films, Fictions, States of Mind

SLAVIC 189: The Other Russia: Twenty-First Century Films, Fictions, States of Mind
Stephanie Sandler, Ernest E. Monrad Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures 

Russia is in the news these days for its politics and espionage, but what about the daily lives of Russian people? Nothing gets at that reality in all its pettiness and grandeur better than Russian literature. The stories, poems, plays, movies, memoirs, and documentaries of the last twenty-five years are the subject of this course. We will trace the chaotic transitions of the 1990s, the disparities of wealth and polarized politics of the 2000s, the rise of religious thinking (Orthodox, Islam, Jewish), and the several conflicts at Russia’s borders. The impact of travel, diaspora, and the internet on breaking down old walls that once isolated the USSR will be as important as changes in the legal order. The different fates of former Soviet republics will be compared, with examples from Ukraine, the Caucasus, and the far North.

Writers include Svetlana Aleksievich, Joseph Brodsky, Elena Fanailova, Linor Goralik, Alisa Ganieva, Boris Khersonsky, Viktor Pelevin, Liudmila Petrushevskaya, Vladimir Sorokin, and Serhiy Zhadan. Films to include Leviathan, FourAlexandra, My Joy, and Maidan. Students will also interview and create portraits (visual, verbal, and video) of émigrés from the former Soviet Union living in the Boston area, using the interviews as a context for the cultural representations of life in and beyond Russia.

 

SOC-STD 68EC: Education and Community in America

Education and Community in America: Universities and Community Engagement, 1890-2017  
Ariane Mary Liazos, Lecturer on Social Studies

Explores efforts to realize the civic purpose of American universities, particularly in terms of attempts to engage local communities through educational outreach programs. Examines major periods of experimentation and innovation in the 20th and 21st centuries, from the settlement house movement of the early 1900s to recent efforts to revive the public mission of universities through service-learning and other forms of civic education. This course is an activity-based learning course, limited to students who are concurrently participating in education-related service programs affiliated with Harvard. Class discussions and assignments will make active links with students' service work. Enrollment capped at 10.

SPANSH 59: Spanish and the Community

Spanish and the Community
María Luisa Parra, Senior Preceptor in Romance Languages and Literatures

An advanced language course that examines the richness and complexity of the Latino experience in the US while promoting community engagement as a vehicle for greater linguistic fluency and cultural understanding. Students are placed with community organizations within the Boston area and volunteer for four hours a week. Class work focuses on expanding students' oral and written proficiency in Spanish through discussing and analyzing readings, arts, and films by and about Latinos in the US.

AESTHINT 13-RX: Arts For Global Health

Doris Sommer, Ira and Jewell Williams Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and of African and African American Studies; and Mercedes Becerra, Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine

Technical remedies alone seldom address the complex challenges of global health. Fear or humiliation may interfere with diagnosis and available treatments. Stigma or ignorance of causes and cures can create escalating epidemics. So innovative health providers have learned to rely on creative interventions through the arts and, by extension, through creative education.Inspired by The Global Health Education and Learning Incubator at Harvard University, our course considers the dynamic between health conditions and conditions for health, as well as responses to those conditions, both medical and non-medical. Resources for significant non-medical responses often come from cultural interventions, including traditional and contemporary arts. The interconnectedness of conditions and the far-reaching effects of creative responses are explored through cases of arts intervention in health care and through theories of why art works. What is therapeutic about making art and about thinking through the process? Readings and discussion engage a tradition of aesthetic philosophy that begins in the European Enlightenment to promote broad-based art-making as a response to conflict (Schiller) and to stimulate freedom of thought by starting with beauty (Kant). Surprising expectations and inviting us to think about the effects, "Rx: Arts for Global Health" offers basic training in the enlightened tradition of aesthetic judgment while it tracks some cases of arts that support global health.In lectures by instructors and guest speakers, the course considers how change and growth in global health can benefit from an aesthetic approach to technical and social challenges. Theoretical readings (Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Arendt, Schiller, Dewey, Freire, Gramsci, Ranciere, Mockus, Boal, Nussbaum, inter alia) accompany concrete cases of treating malaria, tuberculosis, HIV, depression. The final project will be a "case study," of a particular health challenge, including a proposal for a creative intervention.

 

Spring 2018 Engaged Scholarship Courses

EXPOS 231 and 232: Segregation and Boston Schools

EXPOS 231 and 232: Segregation and Boston Schools: The Fight for Equality                                                           Ariane Mary Liazos, Preceptor in Expository Writing

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1-2pm (231) and 2-3pm (232)

Over sixty years after the Supreme Court ruled that “separate but equal” schools are unconstitutional, segregation is on the rise. Today, despite widespread evidence that integrated education increases student learning and reduces prejudice, American public schools are increasingly divided by class and race. In this course, we investigate attempts to achieve educational equality in Boston, focusing on the decision to use busing to desegregate the public schools in the 1970s and the wave of violent opposition that followed. Throughout the semester, we undertake “engaged scholarship,” combining academic learning and community engagement by collaborating with Bostonians directly affected by these historical events – we partner with history teachers and students at a neighborhood high school in the Boston Public Schools (BPS) system – and by focusing on communication with diverse audiences through writing, speaking, and visual presentation. 

To ground our understanding of the complex issues we will wrestle with, we begin with a journalist’s Pulitzer Prize winning account of school integration in the 1970s, contrasting the perspectives of black and white families. We next examine historical debates on the causes of the “antibusing” movement and pedagogical debates about how to teach controversial and contested historical topics. For the final project, we have the opportunity to further investigate these topics and other current challenges around educational equity facing BPS. In thoughtful collaboration with our community partners and through research, we design lesson plans for a high school course on desegregation and prepare arguments for why the various plans might be effective. We not only delve into the remarkable written and visual materials in Harvard’s libraries but also conduct conversations with teachers and students at Brighton High School. The class culminates in a “Civics Fair” (held at Harvard’s Education Portal serving residents of the Allston and Brighton neighborhoods) in which students present their lesson plans and engage with our partners at Brighton High and other community members.

PLEASE NOTE: The “Engaged Scholarship” components of this course include three required meetings outside class time that have been tentatively scheduled in March and April: a panel discussion held on Harvard’s campus with teachers from Brighton High (March 7 from 7:00-8:30 PM); a visit to Brighton High (students have the option of visiting on either April 5 from 7:45-10:45 AM or April 7 from 11:15 AM-2:15 PM); and a “Civics Fair” Hosted by the Harvard Ed Portal (April 28 from 10:30 AM-1:30 PM).

MUSIC 176R: Music and Disability

MUSIC 176R: Music and Disability
Andrew Clark, Senior Lecturer on Music, Director of Choral Activities

Wednesdays 12-2 pm

Through field work, readings, discussions, and presentations, this course will explore topics related to disability in music history, music theory, and performance studies, and examine recent developments in neuroscience, music therapy, and music education. Defining disability as a cultural construction rather than as a medical pathology, the course will also consider the practice of music as a vehicle of empowerment, reflecting on music’s generative role in shaping communities and advancing social justice and human rights. Students will design and implement inclusive and democratic community music projects, partnering with local service organizations and educational institutions.

SOC-STD 68CT: The Chinese Immigrant Experience in America

The Chinese Immigrant Experience in America
Nicole Newendorp, Lecturer in Social Studies

Thursdays 1-3 pm

Uses the history of Boston’s Chinatown as a case study to examine the experiences of Chinese immigrants in the U.S. from the 1880s until the present. Employs historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives to examine major themes related to the social and economic development of U.S. Chinatowns and Chinese immigrant communities throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. This course is an activity-based learning course, limited to students who are concurrently participating in a Harvard-affiliated service program in or around Boston’s Chinatown. Class discussions and assignments will make active links with students’ service work. Open to students in all concentrations.

Visit the course website to learn more about the course project.

SPANSH 59: Spanish and the Community

Spanish and the Community
María Luisa Parra, Senior Preceptor in Romance Languages and Literatures

An advanced language course that examines the richness and complexity of the Latino experience in the US while promoting community engagement as a vehicle for greater linguistic fluency and cultural understanding. Students are placed with community organizations within the Boston area and volunteer for four hours a week. Class work focuses on expanding students' oral and written proficiency in Spanish through discussing and analyzing readings, arts, and films by and about Latinos in the US.

SPANSH 59H: Spanish for Latino Students II

Spanish for Latino Students II: Connecting with the Community                                                                                      Maria Luisa Parra, Senior Preceptor in Romance Languages and Literatures

Tuesdays & Thursdays 1-2:30 pm

An advanced language course for Spanish heritage learners that aims to: strengthen students’ oral and written linguistic range, with emphasis on Spanish use for academic contexts; and to further develop students’ critical language and social awareness around important issues for Latinos in our globalized era: Spanish as global language, identity, language rights, global migration and labor, U.S.-Latino America relations, food and environment, the ’war on drugs’. Students explore these topics through various genres (newspapers and academic articles, debates, literary essays, short novels, poetry, visual art, film and music) and through 4 hours a week of community service.

PSY 1009: Psychology of Women

PSY 1009: Psychology of Women                                                                                                                               Nicole Noll, Preceptor in Psychology

Tuesdays & Thursdays 10-11:30 am

How does being a woman affect our behavior, our evaluations of ourselves, and our interactions with others? This course examines psychological science on women and girls in western industrialized societies, addressing such topics as gender stereotypes, girlhood, women and work, relationships, pregnancy and motherhood, mental health, violence against women, and women in later adulthood. We will consider these topics through an understanding of gender as a social construction, being mindful of the intersections of gender, sexuality, class, and race. Although focused on women’s lives and experiences, this course is highly relevant to people of all genders.

Course Notes: The Psychology Department requires completion of Science of Living Systems 20 (or equivalent) and at least one foundational course from PSY 14, PSY 15, PSY 18, or Science of Living Systems 15 before enrolling in this course. 

 

 

Other Academic

Emerging Scholars Program

Emerging Scholars Program                                                                                                                                          Robin Gottlieb, Professor of the Practice of Mathematics, Senior Teaching Associate at Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning                                                                                                                                                             Brendan Kelly, Preceptor of Mathematics

This new, four-year pilot program is designed for Freshman interested in STEM fields who need additional support in Mathematics. Students are selected through an application process.